The Underbelly Project

The Underbelly Project is/was an art installation that took place in an abandoned subway tunnel in New York City, with murals of large magnitude painted onto the subway’s walls. This video from the New York Times documents its conception. As far as sounds go in the video, the only noise to be heard is the soundtrack, which is a simple piece of music that accompanies the piece well; the idea of the gallery under the city is sort of fantastical and the sequence of film shown is almost otherworldly, by setting it to this specific soundtrack it alludes more to the sense of fantasy that is being created. They used different methods in editing the film together, from stop motion with a camera to a time lapse and extended exposure times. Using a time lapse to display this idea of a gallery remaining eternally under the city is quite clever. They’re showing how it went up over time but also alluding to how it will be there forever. The stop motion also worked as a good walkthrough, to display the different things going on and the movement within the tunnel without just rolling along on a camera. Had they chosen to run actual footage through the tunnel it wouldn’t have the same sense of non-reality, a world apart. The cuts, although obvious from being stop motion, blend together fairly fluidly; there’s never a question of how we got to one spot from another or where the story might be going.

The Underbelly Project